8pm, 13th February – Everywoman: One Woman’s Truth About Speaking the Truth by Jess Phillips

“The outspoken Labour MP shares empowering stories from her own life – and she tells them well” puked The Guardian in March 2017. Whilst the Evening Standard said, “Phillips comes across as great company — not just passing the “Would you go for a drink with her?” test but making sure you’d end the evening having put the world to rights but lost both your shoes and your dignity.”

Strap yourself in and bring your drinking trousers. This could be a heck of a ride.

Check out the GoodReads page here.

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8pm, 13th March – Montaigne by Stefan Zweig

Recommended to me (SD) with the following…

“There are two kinds of biographies: Long ones which tell you every fact about the person’s life and short ones which capture the person’s essence and the lessons of their life. This biography by Stefan Zweig is a brilliant, urgent and important example of the latter. What I would call a moral biography. That is, a book that teaches you how to live through the story of another person.

If you’ve been struggling with the onslaught of negative news and political turmoil, read Montaigne. Why? It’s the biography of man who retreated from the chaos of 16th century France to study himself, written by a man fleeing the chaos of 20th century Europe. When I say it’s timely, I mean that it’s hard to be a thinking person and not see alarming warning signs about today’s world while reading this book. Yet it also gives us a solution: Turn inward. Master yourself. Montaigne is one of humanity’s greatest treasures—a wise and insightful thinker who never takes himself too seriously.

This book helped me get through 2017, no question.”

 

Read the GoodReads page here

8th May 2018 – The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie

The real struggles of a Native American boy make an uplifting story.

The title tells it like it is. Sherman Alexie was born a Spokane Indian. He grew up where the book is set, on a reservation – the “rez” – in Wellpinit, Washington state. He was, like his central character, hydrocephalic at birth, “with too much grease inside my skull”. And in his teens he attended Reardan High School, off the reservation, near the rich farm town, where all the other students were white. Many authors hum and ha when asked if their fiction is in any way autobiographical. This one makes no bones about it and yet skilfully manages to transform his actual experience into a novel. True fiction. Absolutely.

Read the GoodReads page here.